Friday, October 12, 2018

Breakfast
6:30-7:50 am

WVMA Annual Meeting

Robert Leder, DVM and Jordan Lamb, JD

Join Dr. Robert Leder as he reflects on his year as WVMA President and passes the gavel onto Dr. Alan Holter. Following the presidential transition, WVMA's legal counsel will provide an update on what your association has accomplished legislatively and how the Political Action Committee (PAC) works for veterinarians in Wisconsin.

7:30 am

Bakery/Coffee/Milk

Small Animal Tracks
8-9 am

Atopic Dermatitis – Part 1

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

We will discuss the causes of atopic dermatitis (food and environmental), as well as symptoms patients exhibit when suffering from atopic dermatitis. How do you tell if a patient has food induced vs. environmental induced disease?

For food allergy we will specifically focus on how to perform a good food trial to rule out food allergy before referral to dermatologist.

OR

Making Integrative Medicine a Success in Your Practice

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Establishing a scientific platform and rational framework is vital to making integrative medicine succeed in your practice. In this overview talk, Dr. Robinson presents the basics of building a strong foundation upon which to introduce integrative options within a clinic or hospital setting.

  • No “Woo Woo”: Clients can sense when being sold “a bill of goods”, i.e., products or treatments based on myth and folklore rather than science and substance. In this talk, Dr. Robinson will provide the opportunity for learners to decide for themselves which sounds more legitimate.
  • Get Everyone on Board: Educating all workers in a practice about the science and evidence of integrative healthcare, from the front office to the specialty center, help to communicate information about its potential value to clients, with the end result often being better animal health, fewer frustrating failures, and a more solid client base. Dr. Robinson will introduce attendees to a variety of in-house and online educational opportunities that practices can access in order to find factual content concerning acupuncture, massage, photomedicine and botanical medicine.
9:10-10:10 am

Atopic Dermatitis – Part 2

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Treatment of environmental allergies including discussion of sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy vs. subcutaneous allergen specific immunotherapy. Pros and cons of each type of allergen specific immunotherapy will be discussed as well as other medical management options for atopic dermatitis.

OR

Marketing Integrative Medicine to Your Clients

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

No matter how much we tweet, post, Facebook, and Instagram, the most important draw for clients is us! How well do we care for our patients, communicate with our clients, and offer clinically meaningful options that reduce the need for costly, invasive, and potential harmful interventions? How much do we “practice what we preach” by creating an environment that feels welcoming, safe, and supportive to the families that visit us? Marketing means more than advertising. In this talk, Dr. Robinson will address ways to let clients know that you include integrative care with artful and intelligent solutions.

10:10-10:40 am

Break

10:40-11:40 am

Otitis

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Otitis is always secondary to an underlying cause. We will review the most common underlying causes of otitis and how to rule them in/out. We will focus on when to send cases for further imaging and/or when it is time to refer a case of repeat otitis to a dermatologist.

OR

Getting the Staff on Board with Integrative Medicine

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Shifting the focus from battling disease to cultivating health brings a fresh perspective to practicing medicine. It means updating and upgrading the old drugs-and-surgery mentality to one that attends more pro-actively to ensuring patient comfort, mobility, and a pain-free existence.

In this talk, Dr. Robinson will present the rationale for moving medicine forward based on the top ten conditions in veterinary medicine wherein integrative medicine can make the most impact. In so doing, she will detail an updated approach to each one, based more on common pathogeneses that are amenable to early correction instead of addressing disease conditions as discrete and isolated phenomena.

11:40-1:30 pm Lunch

Ticket required

1:30-2:30 pm

Methicillin Resistant Skin Infections

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Are you seeing methicillin resistant skin infections? My bet is you are even if you don’t know it! We will review what a methicillin resistant infection is. We will discuss how to perform skin cultures in superficial and deep skin infections. Most importantly we will discuss judicious use of antibiotics so that we do not promote antibiotic resistance in our patients. In addition, finding the underlying cause of the recurrent skin infections is of upmost importance in reducing the recurrence.             

OR

How Integrative Medicine Has the Potential to Elevate Standards of Care and Reduce Reliance on Drugs and Surgery

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

In keeping with the highest ethical standards, clients need to be informed in an unbiased manner of risks and benefits of a spectrum of legitimate integrative medical interventions. Preventing them from learning about effective, safe, non-surgical options does a disservice to them as well as their animal. Suitable alternatives may include medical acupuncture, laser therapy and light emitting diodes (photomedicine), medical massage, and botanical medicine.

In this lecture, Dr. Robinson makes the case for the aforementioned modalities as first-line approaches for problems that include pelvic limb lameness, often assumed to be cranial cruciate disease, and intervertebral disk disease, with and without spinal cord injury. Both human and veterinary medical providers can learn from each other with these conditions in order to establish best practices – a clear example of the benefits of the One Health movement.       

2:30-2:55 pm Break
2:55-3:55 pm

Pemphigus Foliaceus

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

We will discuss differences in history and physical exam findings in patients with pemphigus vs. other causes of dermatitis so that you can determine when you should be considering a different approach to these patients vs. an allergy patient. We will discuss options for treatments in dogs and cats.

OR

How Opioids and Cannabis Compare for the Alleviation of Pain

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

With human medicine looking toward the potential for cannabis to help counter over-reliance on prescription opioids and other pain drugs, research is building that will one day give veterinarians a head start on the conscientious and careful inclusion of cannabis into multimodal pain treatment.

Are you up to speed on the mechanisms of action, indications, contraindications, and potential side effects of opioid medication versus cannabis products? Ready or not, cannabis has come to veterinary medicine in the form of biscuits, tinctures, salves, and more. Learn the science; don’t remain in the dark. Know the risks so that you can anticipate the benefits and/or negative consequences of administering opioids to an animal already maintained on cannabis.

In this talk, Dr. Robinson will cover the science and evidence concerning relative analgesic value as well as their comparative effects on the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems.

4:05-5:05 pm

Cutaneous Lymphoma

Christine Graham, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

We will discuss differences in history and physical exam findings in patients with cutaneous lymphoma vs. other causes of dermatitis, so that you can determine when you should be considering a different approach to these patients vs. an allergy patient. We will discuss the types of cutaneous lymphoma and review options for treatments.

OR

Medical Acupuncture and Photomedicine Approaches for Pain 

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Most of our patients’ pain problems originate and are perpetuated by changes in the nervous system and connective tissue. Acupuncture addresses a wide gamut of pain problems by restoring the neural matrix to a more healthful state of function, by means of a process called “neuromodulation.” It also frees and relaxes restrictions in the connective tissue that, when left unattended, restrict mobility, impair circulation, and worsen discomfort. Dr. Robinson has developed a comprehensive, science-based approach to the treatment of pain with medical acupuncture. In this lecture, Dr. Robinson will describe her Medical Acupuncture and Integrative Neuromodulation ® approach to orthopedic, neurologic, and various pain problems. Her technique works through neurophysiologic, neuroanatomic, and myofascial avenues to address pain and soft tissue restriction.

Large Animal Tracks
 8-9 am

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 1

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

While the goal of feeding a healthy horse is to meet its nutritional requirements, the availability of various feed types and supplements seems at times overwhelming to horse owners and veterinarians. Further, the custom of feeding by volume rather than by weight, often leads to the over conditioning of horses. This lecture will review the basic nutritional needs of the healthy horse as well as present simple but effective nutritional guidelines for a variety of horse types.

OR

Introduction to Mycoplasma Mastitis: History and Evolution

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

A contagious disease is one where the infectious agent is transmitted from an infected animal to another animal.  With respect to mastitis there are three major pathogens that have classically been thought of as contagious: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae and Mycoplasma bovis. The latter will be the focus of lectures 1-4 and although Mycoplasma bovis is one of several species that are under the umbrella of the mycoplasma mastitis syndrome, Mycoplasma bovis is the most prevalent cause of mastitis within the genus. In this first lecture the discovery and emergence of Mycoplasma bovis as a mastitis pathogen will be discussed. The role of other species with the genus will also be addressed. 

OR

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 1

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

These sessions will discuss current knowledge of colic and lameness for the practicing veterinarian.

 

9:10-10:10 am

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 2

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Part 1.

OR

Mycoplasma Mastitis:  Detection and Diagnosis                    

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

The discovery and description of mycoplasma mastitis was hampered by the fastidious nature of the organism. Mycoplasma sp. require a reduced oxygen tension and nutrients normally not requisite for growth by other mastitis pathogens. Moreover, they are very slow growing and after 10 days of culture mycoplasma colonies are rarely visible without the aid of magnification. Culture is still the basis of mycoplasma mastitis diagnosis.  However, determination of the agent via PCR and diagnosis through antibody titer (ELISA) are replacing culture as the “go-to” method for diagnosis. These latter two techniques are more rapid and simpler, although more expensive than culture. Specifics of diagnosis and how they compare will be discussed. Additionally, the importance of detection will be addressed 

OR

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 2

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Part 1.

10:10-10:40 am

Break

10:40-11:40 am

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 3

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1 and 2.

OR

Mycoplasma Mastitis Epidemiology: Case Studies

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

Mycoplasma mastitis is difficult to detect, and outbreaks are sporadic in nature. Thus, much of our understanding of the nature of mycoplasma mastitis has relied on case studies. In this lecture case studies describing the epidemiology and properties of the agent will be presented. A better understanding of the epidemiology and properties of Mycoplasma sp. has shaped the development of strategies required to control the mycoplasma mastitis disease syndrome.

OR

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 3

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1 and 2.

11:40-1:30 pm Lunch

Ticket required

1:30-2:30 pm

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 4

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-3.

OR

Mycoplasma Mastitis Control: How Does it Fit into a Mastitis Control Program?

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

Traditionally, contagious mastitis pathogens have been controlled via three points of attack: strict milking time hygiene; dry cow therapy; and selective culling of infected cattle. This control program has worked extremely well for Streptococcus agalactiae, reasonably well for S. aureus, but perhaps less well for mycoplasma mastitis pathogens. The success and failures of the three points of attack on mycoplasma mastitis will be discussed as well as the strategies needed to monitor the syndrome.

OR

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 4

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-3.

2:30-2:55 pm  Break
2:55-3:55 pm

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 5

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-4.

OR

The Argument for Selective Dry Cow Therapy

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

Blanket dry cow therapy can fulfill the stated purposes as it has been shown to be effective in curing some existing intramammary infections as cows enter the dry period and prevent additional infections that develop during this time. This fulfillment of purpose would support its long-standing use as a significant component of a mastitis control program.  However, the blanket recommendation for such therapy has been called into question. The number of existing intramammary infections is thought to be much reduced in cows as evidenced by the shrinking somatic cell count over time. Some would argue the risk of antibiotic residues in dairy farm milk increases with blanket dry therapy use and thus the blanket therapy should be avoided.  Another argument has been made that blanket therapy use will lead to the development of antibiotic resistant strains of mastitis pathogens which will threaten bovine and human health. A third argument could be made that instillation of intramammary products always carries the risk of introducing a new infection into the mammary gland, an iatrogenic infection. In this lecture the risks that blanket dry cow therapy poses to the dairy cow and dairy industry will be explored. Different selective dry cow therapy management schemes will also be discussed.

OR

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 5

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-4.

4:05-5:55 pm

Systematic Approach to Troubleshooting the Milking Center – Part 6

Daryl Nydam, DVM, PhD & Matthias J. Wieland, DVM, DECBHM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-5.

OR  

Blanket Dry Cow Therapy: Still the Norm

Larry Fox, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

The efficacy of dry cow therapy as an intervention strategy to help control mastitis is well established. Antibiotic dry cow therapy cures existing infections and will help prevent the establishment of new infections. The application of dry cow therapy and other mastitis control procedures have led to dramatic reductions in contagious mastitis and a significant improvement in udder health. In this paper it is acknowledged that the improvement in udder health may warrant the consideration of selective dry cow therapy, but that the vast majority of herds will profit more by choosing dry cow therapy for all their cows; blanket therapy.

OR                          

Equine Colic and Wellness – Part 6

Bo Brock, DVM, DABVP (Equine) (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Parts 1-5.

Evening Events
5:00-6:15 pm

Evening Reception

Come to the Evening Reception in the exhibit hall for a networking reception with your fellow veterinarians, practice managers, CVT's and exhibitors! Food and drink provided. Everyone is invited!

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4610 S. Biltmore Lane, Suite 107
Madison, WI 53718
Phone: (608) 257-3665
Fax: (608) 257-8989
Email: wvma@wvma.org

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