Thursday, October 11, 2018

Breakfast
 7:30 am

Bakery/Coffee/Milk

Small Animal Tracks
8-9 am Update on Insulin Therapy: What’s Available and When to Use it

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

This session will discuss currently available insulin formulations including newer human insulin analogs. A general overview of the use of these insulin formulations will be included in this session.

OR                                         

Cytologic Diagnosis of Infectious/Inflammatory Diseases – Part 1

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

Cytologic diagnosis of various inflammatory/infectious diseases can be a challenging skill, and veterinarians vary on their confidence in identifying different organisms. This talk will be a case-based approach to identifying different types of inflammatory patterns and different types of “bugs” in various cytologic preparations.

9:10-10:10 am How to Deal with Problem Diabetics

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

This case-based session will focus on evaluating, monitoring, and switching insulin formulations in unregulated canine diabetics. 

OR                                         

Cytologic Diagnosis of Infectious/Inflammatory Diseases – Part 2

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Part 1.

10:10-10:30 am

Break

10:30-11:30 am Things to Consider When Treating Feline Diabetes

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

Insulin selection, monitoring strategies, and diabetic remission will be discussed during this session. 

 OR                                         

Cancer Cytopathology – Part 1

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

After a bit of a refresher of some cytology basics regarding various tissue-type cells, this two-part talk will be cased-based focusing on the cytopathology of various neoplastic diseases.

11:30-1 pm Lunch

Ticket required

OR

Lunch Bunch

The Power of Voice -  Mental Health Issues in Veterinary Medicine 

Lisa Peters, DVM, DACVECC (1.2 non-scientific CE)

Ticket required

Veterinarians and veterinary team members are prone to high rates of burn-out, anxiety, compassion fatigue, ethical fatigue, and depression. Suicide rates have increased within the profession as well. Dr. Lisa Peters will discuss these issues in veterinary medicine and how we can use our voices to implement change. She will also discuss how we can improve our own resilience and maintain wellness within the workplace.

1-2 pm

It has to be Cushing’s

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

Diagnostic test results from cases will be used to demonstrate some of the challenges associated with establishing a diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism. The session will discuss the approach to testing when the initial screening test does not support the diagnosis. 

OR                                         

Cancer Cytopathology – Part 2

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

Continuation of Part 1. 

2-2:45 pm Break
2:45-3:45 pm Trilostane Treatment and Monitoring: Is the ACTH Stimulation Test Gone for Good?

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

The session will focus on monitoring of trilostane therapy including new information about the use of resting cortisol concentrations. Case examples will be used to discuss therapeutic assessment and trilostane dosage adjustments. 

OR                                         

Diagnostic Considerations and Interpretations for Bleeding Patients

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

There are many important considerations when dealing with a patient with an acquired or inherited bleeding disorder. This talk and the following notes will address some of the important issues and questions veterinarians deal with when considering the proper testing and diagnosis of a bleeding patient. Both primary (platelet, vWF) and secondary (coagulation) disorders will be discussed.

3:55-4:55 pm

Approach to the PU/PD Dog

Jon Fletcher, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (1.2 CE)

This session will use clinical cases to review causes and the diagnostic approach to polyuria and polydipsia in dogs.

OR                                         

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenias: A Differential to Consider, Especially for Non-Clinical Thrombocytopenias

Pete W. Christopherson, BS, MS, DVM (1.2 CE)

Our laboratory handles increasing numbers of cases of congenital macrothrombocytopenia that have been mistaken and often mistreated as a pathologic thrombocytopenia, particularly immune mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT). Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is the breed associated with congenital macrothrombocytopenia by most veterinarians; however, many other breeds have been diagnosed with this condition with many more likely yet to be discovered. This talk and the supportive notes will provide some very useful information about this condition for practicing veterinarians and emphasize that congenital macrothrombocytopenia be on the differential list in any instance where there is a thrombocytopenia in the absence of clinical bleeding and a lack of response to medical therapy.

 

Large Animal Tracks
 8-9 am Relationship Between Management and Nutrition of the Dry Cow and Health of the Neonatal Calf

Robert B. Corbett, DVM, PAS, DACAN (1.2 CE)

The effects of poor nutrition and stress during the pre-partum period, and how this affects the cow as well as the calf will be discussed.

OR                                         

Genetic Improvement Basics

Dan Weigel, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

How are genetic and genomic predictions developed?  How does the heritability of a trait affect our ability to make genetic progress?  Do genetic predictions really translate into differences in actual performance?

Sponsored by:

Zoetis tm 4c

 

 

OR                                         

APHIS Module 8: International Movement of Horses

Paul W. Kunde, DVM (1.2 CE)

This module provides information specific to the international movement of horses and other equids and complements NVAP Module 2: Role of Agencies and Health Certificates.

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the economic importance of the U.S. equine industry;
  • Recognize that international travel of horses is the major contributing factor to the global spread of equine diseases;
  • Locate and correctly determine the requirements and procedures that must be completed to export U.S. horses;
  • Perform your roles and responsibilities as an accredited veterinarian (AV);
  • Recognize that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the documents you sign regardless of who assists you in preparing them;
  • Recognize that only you or another AV may perform all of the testing, identification, and immunizations which may be required for horses to travel; and
  • Fully and properly perform all facets of the export process.
9:10-10:10 am

Improving Colostrum Quality and Management on the Farm

Robert B. Corbett, DVM, DACAN (1.2 CE)

A recent study has shown that 43 percent of colostrum samples tested were below the suggested level for high quality.  Ways to improve colostrum quality and management to improve the rate of successful passive transfer will be covered.

OR                                        

Dairy Genetic Programs Today

Dan Weigel, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

What traits are available for use today? Which traits are important for a commercial dairy herd? Are we really making genetic faster genetic progress?

Sponsored by:

Zoetis tm 4c

 

 

OR                                         

APHIS Module 9: Interstate and International Health Certificates for Category I Animals

Amber Kerk, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

This module will provide information specific to the movement of dogs and cats between States and to other countries. 

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • List the various agencies and steps involved in the certification process for Category I animals;
  • Find current import and export information for Category I animals traveling interstate or internationally;
  • Apply proper completion principles when completing health certificates for Category I animals and avoid making common errors; and
  • Explain your roles and responsibilities as an accredited veterinarian as they relate to Category I animal health certificates.
10:10-10:30 am

Break

10:30-11:30 am

Nutritional Management of the Milk-Fed Calf – Part 1

Robert B. Corbett, DAVM, PAS, DACAN (1.2 CE)

Good nutrition of the milk-fed calf is necessary to optimize the function of the immune system as well as maximize average daily gain. The maximum genetic potential of each calf cannot be realized without excellent nutrition. Average daily gain is directly correlated to milk production when the animal enters the lactating herd.

OR                                         

Leveraging Genetic Tools

Dan Weigel, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

Does it make sense to proactively manage the production and selection of replacement heifers? Are good dairy herds really using beef bulls? Why are commercial dairy herds doing Embryo Transfer? Will tools like gene editing ever impact dairy production?

Sponsored by:

Zoetis tm 4c

 

 

 11:30-1 pm Lunch

Ticket required

OR

Lunch Bunch

The Power of Voice -  Mental Health Issues in Veterinary Medicine 

Lisa Peters, DVM, DACVECC (1.2 non-scientific CE)

Ticket required

Veterinarians and veterinary team members are prone to high rates of burn-out, anxiety, compassion fatigue, ethical fatigue, and depression. Suicide rates have increased within the profession as well. Dr. Lisa Peters will discuss these issues in veterinary medicine and how we can use our voices to implement change. She will also discuss how we can improve our own resilience and maintain wellness within the workplace.

 1-2 pm

Nutritional Management of the Milk-Fed Calf – Part 2

Robert B. Corbett, DAVM, PAS, DACAN (1.2 CE)

Weaning is a difficult transition period for the calf and must be done as smoothly as possible in order to maintain the same rate of gain, minimize morbidity and mortality, and maximize future productivity.

OR                                         

Dairy at a Crossroads—Regional and Structural Changes in the Industry - Part 1

Mark Stephenson, MS, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

How did we get here — A brief history of milk production and regulation in the U.S.

 2-2:45 pm  Break
2:45-3:45 pm Nutritional Management of the Replacement Dairy Heifer from Weaning to Calving

Robert B. Corbett, DAVM, PAS, DACAN (1.2 CE)

Allowing each heifer to obtain her maximum genetic potential in weight gain is directly related to future productivity. This is true for post-weaned heifers as well as milk-fed calves. Weaned heifers are traditionally low protein, poor quality forages and concentrates that reduce average daily gain and immune function.

OR                                         

Dairy at a Crossroads—Regional and Structural Changes in the Industry - Part 2

Mark Stephenson, MS, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

What changes are taking place today — Genetic and management advances, impacts of climate change, shifting consumer tastes and locations.

OR

APHI Module 24: Collecting and Shipping Swine Diagnostic Samples

Tim Diveau, DVM (1.2 CE)

This module provides information on collection techniques for swine diagnostic specimens and the necessary steps for collecting, labeling, packaging, and shipping diagnostic samples. It will also emphasize occasions when collecting samples is not appropriate, as in the case of suspected foreign animal diseases. Lastly, this module addresses regulations related to shipping samples.

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Follow proper procedures when a foreign animal disease is suspected;
  • Incorporate the diagnostic sample collection techniques presented here into your daily routine;
  • Access regulations for shipping diagnostic sample submissions; and
  • List the necessary steps for shipping diagnostic samples to your preferred veterinary diagnostic laboratory.
3:55-4:55 pm Management Procedures to Improve Feeding Consistency in Dairy Calves

Robert B. Corbett, DAVM, PAS, DACAN (1.2 CE)

Management procedures need to be put in place to carefully monitor the quality, consistency and percent solids in these products and combinations of these products to ensure that nutritional diarrhea and digestive upsets are kept to a minimum.

OR                                         

Dairy at a Crossroads—Regional and Structural Changes in the Industry - Part 3

Mark Stephenson, MS, MS, PhD (1.2 CE)

Our competitors — A look at dairy farming systems competing for world export markets.

OR

APHI Module 3: Overview of Foreign Animal, Program, and Reportable Diseases

Doris Olander, DVM (1.2 CE)

As an accredited veterinarian, awareness and understanding of these diseases is important to the health and well-being of animals and the public.

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Define foreign animal, USDA Program, and reportable diseases;
  • Describe the safeguards that help prevent FADs from entering the U.S.;
  • Outline the steps in a foreign animal disease investigation;
  • List the USDA programs for controlling or eradicating diseases in various species of livestock and poultry;
  • Recognize the additional training opportunities available to accredited veterinarians;
  • Report foreign animal and reportable diseases; and
  • Locate additional resources and learning opportunities.
5:45 pm TB Recertification

Elisabeth Patton, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM

Veterinarians conducting bovine TB testing in Wisconsin must be certified to do so. This certification provides training to veterinarians on a number of aspects of bovine TB testing, from proper handling of tuberculin, injection methods, reading and interpreting results, recording and reporting results, common errors, as well as updates on research and TB affected herds in the US.

Evening Events
5-6 pm Awards Reception
6-7 pm

Awards Ceremony

Join your colleagues and exhibitors in celebrating the excellence within the veterinary medical profession. The Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association, Wisconsin Veterinary Technician Association and Wisconsin Veterinary Practice Managers Association will announce award winners. Food and drinks provided. Everyone is invited!

logo
4610 S. Biltmore Lane, Suite 107
Madison, WI 53718
Phone: (608) 257-3665
Fax: (608) 257-8989
Email: wvma@wvma.org

WVMA-Foundation-Logo Final