Saturday, October 14, 2017

Breakfast
6:30-7:45am

Christian Veterinary Mission Fellowship Breakfast

 

7:30am

Bakery/Coffee/Milk

Coffee Sponsored by Midwest Cremation Services of Wisconsin

 

Small Animal Tracks
8-9 am Osteoarthritis and Joint Supplements: Where is the Evidence?

Chris Frye, DVM (1.2 CE)

This lecture will briefly review the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis and delve into some of the available oral products with supporting literature.

OR                                         

Diagnosing Feline GI Disease: Setting Yourself Up For Success

Craig Webb, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

This presentation addresses the importance of signalment, presenting complaint, history and physical examination with case examples. Positive predictive value will be used to illustrate the central role of clinical expertise in both the choice and interpretation of diagnostic testing.

9:10-10:10am Common Muscle-Tendon Injuries in the Dog and their Treatments

Chris Frye, DVM (1.2 CE)

This lecture will describe some of the more common muscle and/or tendon injuries seen in dogs, how to recognize and diagnose them and current standards of treatment using case examples.

OR                                         

Feline Nutrition: Getting Nutrition Into a Cat

Craig Webb, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

This presentation addresses the anorectic cat, starting with the cause and consequences. Therapeutic targets are highlighted, from attitude to environment to the chemistry and physiology behind the cat's refusal to eat – and how the clinician might best intervene.

10:10-10:50am

Break

Coffee Sponsored by Midwest Cremation Services of Wisconsin

10:50-11:50am Rehabilitation of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Deficiency: Non-Surgical and Post-Surgical Considerations                                

Chris Frye, DVM (1.2 CE)

The lecture explores the biomechanics of the canine stifle joint and reviews the roles of the cranial cruciate ligament. Rehabilitative exercise should be focused on promoting a targeted strengthening and proprioceptive program depending in part on the presentation. Furthermore the discussion will include some of the more common reasons for setbacks or complications that may be encountered.

OR

Feline Constipation: Getting Crap Out Of A Cat

Craig Webb, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

This presentation addresses the common problem of feline constipation and the potential progression to obstipation and megacolon. Early recognition and effective intervention will be emphasized. Therapeutic considerations will include both anecdotal reports and evidence-based medicine.

11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
1-2:30pm WVMA Keynote

Eric Alexander (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Climbing has not always been without its trials. Alexander reminds us of our humanity and demonstrates the courage it takes to succeed in climbing to the "top of the world." Surviving a 150 ft fall in the Himalayas on Mt. Amadablam in 2000 was just the beginning. Alexander developed pulmonary edema and it became clear that he would need to be airlifted to safety. For eight months he struggled with pneumonia and was unable to train for Everest. Gaining inspiration from his team and his faith, Eric dared to dream once again and fought back to play an instrumental role in the historic ascent. Today, Eric Alexander continues to climb and look for new challenges both personally and in the outdoors while challenging people to overcome the "Everests" in their own lives--redefining the limits of what we can achieve.

2:30-2:35pm  Break
2:45-3:45pm Elbow Dysplasia and Rehabilitation: What's New?

Chris Frye, DVM (1.2 CE)

This lecture will briefly review the pathogenesis of elbow dysplasia and the two most common presentations to the rehabilitation practitioner. Presentation and state of disease help dictate the rehabilitation protocol and eventual management of osteoarthritis, including several newer approaches.

OR                                         

Feline Triaditis: Fact Or Philosophy

Craig Webb, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

This presentation will briefly review the pathophysiology of feline IBD, pancreatitis, and cholangitis as it relates to clinically relevant causes and potential treatments of feline triaditis. Furthermore, both evidence-based and anecdotal recommendations and controversies regarding therapy will be discussed.

3:55-4:55pm Physical Therapy Exercises: An Introduction to Attaining Strength, Balance, Spatial Awareness, Gait Retraining, and Range of Motion Through Movement

Chris Frye, DVM (1.2 CE)

This lecture will discuss some of the thought process in setting goals and selecting exercises to to accomplish them using case examples common to practice and and supporting literature. Physiology, biomechanics, patient health, and owner capability all play an important role in selection.

OR                                         

Feline GI Disease: Diagnostic Dilemmas and Failed Therapy

Craig Webb, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

This presentation uses multiple cases to illustrate the differentials for therapy failures in small animal veterinary medicine. The "key features" to both standard and complicated cases will be highlighted to emphasize potential missteps and pitfalls in working up these patients.

 

Large Animal Tracks
8-9am Sensible Treatment of Claw Lesions

Jan Shearer, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Ulcers, white line disease and traumatic lesions of the sole are common lameness disorders in dairy cattle. Since they are often associated with abscess formation, many assume that topical antibiotic therapy is required. Topical therapy is unlikely to be of value; in fact, it is more likely to violate one of the principal precepts of bioethics in medicine "first, do no harm".

OR                                         

APHIS Module 3: Overview: FAD, USDA Program, Reportable Disease

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Define foreign animal, USDA Program and reportable diseases;
  • Describe the safeguards that help prevent fads from entering the U.S.;
  • Outline the steps in a foreign animal disease investigation;
  • List the USDA programs for controlling or eradicating diseases in various species of livestock and poultry;        
  • Recognize the additional training opportunities available to accredited veterinarians;
  • Report foreign animal and reportable diseases; and
  • Locate additional resources and learning opportunities.
 9:10-10:10am Deciphering the Causes of Toe Lesions in Cattle

Jan Shearer, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Toe lesions in cattle are generally chronic conditions with multiple underlying causes. One of the most important is related to thinning of the sole associated with excessive claw wear that leads to "thin sole toe ulcers." Because the underlying causes of toe lesions varies, an accurate diagnosis is important for the development of effective management strategies.

OR                                         

APHIS Module 5: Vesicular Diseases

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Understand the economic impact of a vesicular disease outbreak;
  • Name vesicular diseases that could affect the united states;
  • Apply biosecurity measures specific for vesicular diseases;
  • Recognize the clinical signs associated with vesicular diseases; and
  • Learn how to report a possible vesicular disease case.
10:10-10:50am Break
 10:50-11:50am Infectious Skin Disorders of the Foot

Jan Shearer, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Bovine foot rot (BFR) and digital dermatitis (DD) are common causes of lameness in beef and dairy cattle. Early detection and prompt treatment of BFR is critical to the avoidance of deep digital sepsis conditions that may be difficult to treat without surgical intervention. Despite a growing body of knowledge on DD, strategies for managing DD have progressed very little since its discovery in 1974.

OR                                         

APHIS Module 21: Animals' Fitness to Travel

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the role of the accredited veterinarian when evaluating the fitness of an animal to travel;
  • Describe how to perform an inspection or examination of an animal to determine if it is able to be transported; and
  • Explain steps that can be taken to make livestock transportation more comfortable and safe for animals.
 11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
 1-2:30pm WVMA Keynote

Eric Alexander (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Climbing has not always been without its trials. Alexander reminds us of our humanity and demonstrates the courage it takes to succeed in climbing to the "top of the world." Surviving a 150 ft fall in the Himalayas on Mt. Amadablam in 2000 was just the beginning. Alexander developed pulmonary edema and it became clear that he would need to be airlifted to safety. For eight months he struggled with pneumonia and was unable to train for Everest. Gaining inspiration from his team and his faith, Eric dared to dream once again and fought back to play an instrumental role in the historic ascent. Today, Eric Alexander continues to climb and look for new challenges both personally and in the outdoors while challenging people to overcome the "Everests" in their own lives--redefining the limits of what we can achieve.

 2:30-2:45pm  Break
 2:45-3:45pm The Impact of Lameness on Welfare of Cattle

Jan Shearer, DVM, MS (1.2 CE)

Lameness is the most costly of clinical diseases in dairy cattle with estimates of economic loss approaching $500/case. Measures of the cost of lameness on the welfare of affected animals is equally if not more significant; but, these must be measured using a different form of currency such as that described within the context of the Five Freedoms.

OR                                         

APHIS Module 24: Collecting and Shipping Swine Diagnostic Samples

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

After completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Follow proper procedures when a foreign animal disease is suspected;
  • Incorporate the diagnostic sample collection techniques presented here into your daily routine;
  • Access regulations for shipping diagnostic sample submissions; and
  • List the necessary steps for shipping diagnostic samples to your preferred veterinary diagnostic laboratory.
 3:55-4:55 Acceptable Methods of Euthanasia of Cattle

Jan Shearer, DVM, MS

The 2013 AVMA Euthanasia Guidelines list the following as acceptable methods of euthanasia in cattle: 1) overdose of a barbiturate, 2) gunshot and 3) penetrating or non-penetrating captive bolt (for calves and young animals only) with adjunctive methods to assure death. Complications with respect to carcass disposal when barbiturates are used require that food animal veterinarians familiarize themselves with the methods of gunshot and penetrating captive bolt.

OR                                        

APHIS Module 27: Bovine Trichomoniasis

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • List the impacts of trichomoniasis on the cattle industry;
  • Describe the clinical signs, transmission, and control methods associated with trichomoniasis;
  • Find state trichomoniasis testing and entry requirements for cattle;
  • Develop a herd management plan to reduce the risk of trichomoniasis introduction and spread;
  • Describe the steps of proper sample collection, including how to prevent contamination; and
  • Explain the importance of proper sample handling, packaging, and shipping requirements.
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Madison, WI 53718
Phone: (608) 257-3665
Fax: (608) 257-8989
Email: wvma@wvma.org

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