Saturday, October 10, 2015

Breakfast
6:30-7:45am Christian Veterinary Mission Fellowship Breakfast
7:30am Continental Breakfast
Coffee Sponsored by Midwest Cremation Services of Wisconsin

 

Small Animal Tracks
8-9 am

How We Behave in Private Practice

Melissa Newcomb, DVM and Alicea Howell RVT, VTS (Behavior), KPA CTP (1.2 CE)

Transforming your general practice into a low stress, behaviorally centered facility requires some changes in perspective and protocols. This lecture describes the roles of the veterinarian and the technician in implementing low stress practices.

OR

Managing Chronic Canine Seizures

Heidi Barnes Heller, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

What does good seizure control mean? This session will focus on anti-epileptic drug treatment options, therapeutic monitoring, and target seizure management for canine seizures in a case based format.

OR

What Do Clients Want

Darren Osborne (1.2 CE non-scientific)

Every year, Darren surveys thousands of pet owners to find out what they think about veterinarians, veterinary services and veterinary fees. Did you know that nine of ten pet owners think they go to their veterinarian at least once a year but only 60 percent actually do. Find out why half your clients are shocked with their bill at the end of their visit and how clients feel about seeing different veterinarians in the same hospital.
Sponsored by Marshfield Labs

OR

APHIS Module 4: Preventing Disease Introduction and Spread

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

As an accredited veterinarian, one of your many roles and responsibilities is to ensure disease is not introduced or spread among animal populations. Veterinarians providing education about zoonotic diseases is another important responsibility. This can include instituting biosecurity protocols, proper disinfection procedures, and wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when working with animals. This module will review concepts that are essential to prevent and control the spread of infectious disease agents.

After completing this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:

  • Describe disease prevention practices that limit exposure to animals and humans
  • Select job-appropriate PPE to minimize zoonotic disease exposure and fomite spread
  • Implement appropriate cleaning protocols and select effective disinfectants for different situations
  • Implement basic biosecurity practices for veterinary clinics, animal shelters, and livestock facilities
  • Access additional resources for infection control practices including appropriate PPE selection
9:10-10:10am

A Pinch of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

Melissa Newcomb, DVM (1.2 CE)

One of the most satisfying parts of doing behavior in general practice is the opportunity to find concerning behaviors on regular exams and help prevent them from becoming bigger problems. Early intervention can give both owners and pets a much happier relationship and can pave the way for a healthier pet physically and mentally.


OR

What's New in Feline Seizure Management?

Heidi Barnes Heller, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

Managing a feline patient with seizures can be challenging! In this session we will discuss new (and old) anti-epileptic drug treatment options, how to interpret serum drug levels for cats, and several case examples.

OR

Bundle Everything

Darren Osborne (1.2 CE non-scientific)

Wellness Plans: How to develop them, price them, market them, sell them, and maintain them. Beyond the Wellness Plan: Bundling dentistry, food, senior and chronic plans. Recent studies into pet owners attitudes have shown that your clients are more sensitive to the price of veterinary medicine than ever before. The same research into client's expectations shows bundled services are a big part of the solution. Find out how you might be giving away a lot more of your time and money than you have to.
Sponsored by Marshfield Labs

OR

APHIS Module 6: Exotic Avian Diseases

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

This module consists of two sections that will prepare you to recognize two important diseases that poultry, pet and zoo birds share. First, you will learn some general information that pertains to avian influenza (AI) and exotic Newcastle disease (END). Then you will apply the introductory information to a scenario based on an exotic avian disease case that occurred in the United States.

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Realize the economic impact of an exotic avian disease outbreak
  • Describe the hazards presented by less virulent forms of AI and Newcastle disease viruses
  • Recognize the clinical signs associated with high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) and END
  • Apply basic biosecurity measures for these diseases
  • Report a possible exotic avian disease and understand the investigative process
10:10-10:50am Break
Coffee Sponsored by Midwest Cremation Services of Wisconsin
10:50-11:50am

The Time and Place for Pharmaceuticals

Melissa Newcomb, DVM (1.2 CE)

With the many adjunctive therapies, supplements, diets and psychopharmaceuticals on the market today, it can be difficult to decide what to implement and when. This session discusses indications for implementing your multi-modal therapies to yield the best outcome behaviorally. Indications for sedation and pre-medication for general exam and procedures in private practice are also discussed. By keeping these tools in mind, a pet's medical and prophylactic care can be tailored to their individual behavioral needs to allow that pet to be as comfortable and confident as possible during their visits.


OR

The Neurologic Examination for the Busy Practitioner

Heidi Barnes Heller, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

You don't need to be a neurologist to be successful! Learn tips on how to perform the neurologic examination and localize a lesion within the brain, spinal cord or neuromuscular system. During this session we will review pertinent neuroanatomy and will practice lesion localization through case based discussions.

OR

Creative Pricing Techniques

Darren Osborne (1.2 CE non-scientific)

You can raise your fees and stimulate demand for veterinary medicine at the same time. Alongside fee increases, different bundling options like wellness plans and creative pricing strategies will be explored. Find out how separating your dental cleaning from your oral surgery will increase the demand for dentistry.

OR

APHIS Module 10: Personal Protective Equipment for Veterinarians

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

The focus of this module is primarily on daily protection from biological hazards. A review of more sophisticated levels of PPE utilized as part of an animal health emergency response is also provided.

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:

  • Identify the PPE needed for everyday situations
  • Explain the differences in protection between a surgical mask and an N-95 respirator
  • Perform a brief risk assessment for a given situation and select appropriate PPE
  • Describe the differences between PPE Levels A, B, C and D
11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
1-2:30pm

WVMA Keynote

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, MD (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Dr. Barbara Naterson-Horowitz is the co-author of the bestselling book "Zoobiquity", which presents a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind while redefining the boundaries of medicine. A personal and provocative speaker, Dr. Natterson-Horowitz's lectures are filled with captivating case studies.

2:30-2:35pm  Break
2:45-3:45pm

Keeping Good Puppies from Going Bad

Alicea Howell RVT, VTS (Behavior), KPA CTP (1.2 CE)

This lecture covers puppy socialization classes, what to ask in puppy visits in relation to behavior and recognizing red flags in young puppies. This lecture will help arm you with the information to keep puppies in their home and keep a strong bond with their humans.


OR

Walk the Line: The Many Uses of Gait Analysis

Heidi Barnes Heller, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

During this session we will focus on differentiating between lameness, ataxia and paresis when watching a patient walk and the significance associated with each of these findings.

OR

Filling Your Appointment Book

Darren Osborne (1.2 CE non-scientific)

Who's responsibility is it to get the appointment book filled? This session will teach you how to take charge of your schedule and start running your practice like a dentist. You can get more people in the door and creatively arrange your schedule so you still have time to see your family.

OR

APHIS Module 12: Animal Disease Traceability

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH (1.2 CE)

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:

  • Explain the aspects of ADT to clients and the public
  • List the official identification devices and methods used for different livestock species
  • Explain why documentation of interstate movement of livestock is necessary for effective traceability
  • Locate the regulations governing the interstate movement of different species of livestock
  • Describe the responsibilities of an accredited veterinarian with respect to ADT, specifically Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 86 and Part 161
3:55-4:55pm

Husbandry Training, It's Not Just For Zoos Anymore!

Heidi Barnes Heller, DVM, DACVIM (1.2 CE)

During this session we will review the anatomy and normal function of the vestibular system, and apply this knowledge to a case based discussion of lesion localization, differential diagnosis, diagnostic testing and treatment options for canine vestibular disease.

OR

Real Life Success Stories - Work Life Balance

Darren Osborne (1.2 CE non-scientific)

Learn about about the weird and wonderful ways to achieve work life balance in veterinary medicine. With schedules ranging from 30 hours a week to every other day, you can have a successful practice and a rewarding lifestyle at the same time. This session explores real veterinarians with unreal schedules to find out how incomes can go up while hours worked go down when you break free of conventional schedules.

OR

APHIS Module 23: Use of Antibiotics in Animals

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

One of the primary roles of many accredited veterinarians is to identify, treat, control, and prevent disease in animals. Many of these diseases are a result of a bacterium and require antibiotic administration as a means of treatment to relieve animal suffering and reduce pathogen load in animals destined for human consumption. Deciding which antibiotic to use can be complicated in some cases. Veterinarians utilize their problem solving skills, clinical training, and information gained through continuing education to arrive at the best possible option to treat their patients. Increasing awareness of the diagnostic tools, regulatory issues, and antibiotic resistance debate led to the development of this educational module.
Upon completion of this module, accredited veterinarians will be able to:
  • Evaluate various parameters when selecting antibiotics for use in animals
  • Describe the benefits and limitations of various antibiotic susceptibility testing options
  • Locate and interpret antibiotic labels for the purposes of informed therapeutic decision-making
  • List the agencies involved in regulating antibiotics and monitoring antibiotic resistance and residues
  • Apply the key components of the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA) to making decisions about antibiotics
  • Locate information to assist in making decisions on antibiotic use in animals

 

Large Animal Tracks
8-9am

Residues in Milk and Cull Dairy Cows

Michael Apley, DVM, PhD, DACVCP (1.2 CE)

This session evaluates specific challenges with violative residues in cull dairy cows (as well as other food animals) and also what we have learned from the recent FDA milk residue study. At the end, you will understand where tolerances come from, where they do and don't apply, how cull cows and milk are tested, and a practical to-do list to help your clients avoid violative residues.
Sponsored by Zoetis

OR

APHIS Module 4: Preventing Disease Introduction and Spread

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

As an accredited veterinarian, one of your many roles and responsibilities is to ensure disease is not introduced or spread among animal populations. Veterinarians providing education about zoonotic diseases is another important responsibility. This can include instituting biosecurity protocols, proper disinfection procedures, and wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when working with animals. This module will review concepts that are essential to prevent and control the spread of infectious disease agents.

After completing this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:

  • Describe disease prevention practices that limit exposure to animals and humans
  • Select job-appropriate PPE to minimize zoonotic disease exposure and fomite spread
  • Implement appropriate cleaning protocols and select effective disinfectants for different situations
  • Implement basic biosecurity practices for veterinary clinics, animal shelters, and livestock facilities
  • Access additional resources for infection control practices including appropriate PPE selection
 9:10-10:10am

Juggling VFDs, Prescriptions, VCPRs, ELDU Prohibitions, and Guidance Documents

Michael Apley, DVM, PhD, DACVCP (1.2 CE)

December of 2016 is on the way and marks the time when veterinarians will take responsibility for authorizing an additional 97 percent of all food animal antimicrobial use; that of feed and water use. There are a lot of questions out there as to the VFD format and what all is covered. As if this weren't enough, now there are even more reasons to worry about the definition of "veterinary oversight" and who will determine this definition. What is a guidance document and what does that have to do with you? Are you sure you understand the ins and outs of the extralabel use prohibitions? If you think regulators and legislators are going to be the key drivers of change, you might want to think again.
Sponsored by Zoetis

OR

APHIS Module 6: Exotic Avian Diseases

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

This module consists of two sections that will prepare you to recognize two important diseases that poultry, pet and zoo birds share. First, you will learn some general information that pertains to avian influenza (AI) and exotic Newcastle disease (END). Then you will apply the introductory information to a scenario based on an exotic avian disease case that occurred in the United States.

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Realize the economic impact of an exotic avian disease outbreak
  • Describe the hazards presented by less virulent forms of AI and Newcastle disease viruses
  • Recognize the clinical signs associated with high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) and END
  • Apply basic biosecurity measures for these diseases
  • Report a possible exotic avian disease and understand the investigative process
10:10-10:50am Break
Coffee Sponsored by Midwest Cremation Services of Wisconsin
 10:50-11:50am

What is Driving all this Regulatory Activity Anyway? Real and Perceived Issues with Antibiotic Resistance

Michael Apley, DVM, PhD, DACVCP (1.2 CE)

This session covers the antibiotic resistance challenges in both human and veterinary medicine. How are the challenging pathogens related? Who is to blame? What are the main antibiotics of interest? What is medically important and who decides what is and isn't? Who is this consumer guy anyway?
Sponsored by Zoetis

OR

APHIS Module 10: Personal Protective Equipment for Veterinarians

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

The focus of this module is primarily on daily protection from biological hazards. A review of more sophisticated levels of PPE utilized as part of an animal health emergency response is also provided.

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:

  • Identify the PPE needed for everyday situations
  • Explain the differences in protection between a surgical mask and an N-95 respirator
  • Perform a brief risk assessment for a given situation and select appropriate PPE
  • Describe the differences between PPE Levels A, B, C and D
 11:50-1pm Lunch
Ticket Required
 1-2:30pm

WVMA Keynote

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, MD (1.8 CE non-scientific)

Dr. Barbara Naterson-Horowitz is the co-author of the bestselling book Zoobiquity, which presents a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind while redefining the boundaries of medicine. A personal and provocative speaker, Dr. Natterson-Horowitz's lectures are filled with captivating case studies.

 2:30-2:45pm  Break
 2:45-3:45pm

Where Does Susceptibility Testing Fit in Everyday Practice?

Michael Apley, DVM, PhD, DACVCP (1.2 CE)

Yup, not every animal with a "susceptible" bacterial infection will be a treatment success, and not every animal with a "resistant" infection will be a treatment failure. It is about populations and success/failure rates with and without an effective antibiotic. Do you know which susceptibility testing criteria have been approved by the CLSI? Would you like some questions to ask diagnosticians about your susceptibility testing results which will make them run down the hall screaming and throwing papers? Sure you do.
Sponsored by Zoetis

OR

APHIS Module 12: Animal Disease Traceability

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to:
  • Explain the aspects of ADT to clients and the public
  • List the official identification devices and methods used for different livestock species
  • Explain why documentation of interstate movement of livestock is necessary for effective traceability
  • Locate the regulations governing the interstate movement of different species of livestock
  • Describe the responsibilities of an accredited veterinarian with respect to ADT, specifically Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 86 and Part 161
 3:55-4:55

What Do Antibiotics Actually Do Anyway?

Michael Apley, DVM, PhD, DACVCP (1.2 CE)

Now that we have talked about residues, regulations, resistance, and susceptibility testing, do you ever wonder just what difference you make in treatment outcome for all of this trouble? What about respiratory disease, pinkeye, footrot, hairy heel wart, or mastitis? Well, since you asked, it so happens that in cattle we probably have the most negative-controlled, naturally-occurring disease, prospective, and randomized clinical trial data of any species (including humans). You will get to guess number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for each disease before the results are revealed.
Sponsored by Zoetis

OR

APHIS Module 23: Use of Antibiotics in Animals

Sheryl Shaw, DVM, MPH

One of the primary roles of many accredited veterinarians is to identify, treat, control, and prevent disease in animals. Many of these diseases are a result of a bacterium and require antibiotic administration as a means of treatment to relieve animal suffering and reduce pathogen load in animals destined for human consumption. Deciding which antibiotic to use can be complicated in some cases. Veterinarians utilize their problem solving skills, clinical training, and information gained through continuing education to arrive at the best possible option to treat their patients. Increasing awareness of the diagnostic tools, regulatory issues, and antibiotic resistance debate led to the development of this educational module.
Upon completion of this module, accredited veterinarians will be able to:
  • Evaluate various parameters when selecting antibiotics for use in animals
  • Describe the benefits and limitations of various antibiotic susceptibility testing options
  • Locate and interpret antibiotic labels for the purposes of informed therapeutic decision-making
  • List the agencies involved in regulating antibiotics and monitoring antibiotic resistance and residues
  • Apply the key components of the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA) to making decisions about antibiotics
  • Locate information to assist in making decisions on antibiotic use in animals
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